Sunday, July 16, 2017

Estes Nemesis #2175 Build, Part 1, Parts

While I wait for the paint to dry on the Little Joe II (I don't want to spray anything over the detailed wrap until I am sure) I'll start another build -






This model was a gift, sent along with a custom build for a client.
An interesting "Futuristic Spaceship" introduced in 1990.

Estes gave two different suggested paint schemes, the more reserved white and the "Go Wild" yellow and blue. Frankly, the Go Wild decor is pretty ugly.








On the back of the face card you could WIN ROCKET STUFF in a rocket decoration and naming contest. This reminded me of coloring contests I'd see when I was a kid.

It was a quarterly contest where you could win a $100 merchandise certificate. There is no expiration date - Who knows, the contest might still be running. (But I doubt it.)





Here's all the parts.
The model is BT-50 based and the tube is very clean with small seams.
The balsa is die-cut, the cuts aren't all the way through the 3/32" balsa.




Parts of interest:
The canopy nose cone seam is really rough. These molds should have been replaced before this kit was made.
This was one of the few Estes kits I've seen with an elastic shock cord. It's 1/8" x 18" long.
Stickers! I hate stickers.

10 comments:

  1. Ugh. This era of "Go Wild" paint schemes, and plastic sticker decorations still makes me more uncomfortable than I can rationalize. Ooooof!

    Prowler, Fatboy, Echo, Gemini DC, ...they were all marred by crummy stickers!

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  2. ...Polaris, Sizzler, Outlander, Stormcaster, Wildfire, Ugh! Don't even get me started!

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    1. Hi Overeasy,
      I think all the stickers came about during the Kunick years at Estes. As I understand it, he was a toy developer. I never thought of model rockets as toys. That might explain the use of stickers.

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    2. (shrug) Although I do feel some disappointment with finding stickers rather than waterslide in a model rocket kit, I'm apt to simply accept the situation as a "necessary evil" (especially in the case of otherwise rather simple 3FNC and 4FNC kits) to help attract a younger crowd. Us older folks generally have the means to utilize any aftermarket markings (with a few amongst us that have the know-how to make our own decals).
      Some better examples of sticker in model kit would be in a Gundam model kit and the Tamiya mini-4WD cars. I've seen Gundam kits that had been built back in the 1980s that have the stickers still stuck fast to the surface. The nice thing on many Tamiya and Bandai model kits is that on the box art there is often at least one photo showing an example of a "out-of-box" build (i.e. without any painting), as well as another showing one that had been painted.
      A sort of "best-of-both-worlds" example could be found in the 1:1000 scale Star Trek kits from Polar Lights. They're snap-fit (but can be converted to glue-together by trimming the alignment pins), and feature *both* sticker and decal for markings (with the exception of the "wallpaper" decals for the "Aztec" surface on the movie-era Enterprise, which are supplied only in decal form).

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    3. Hi Naoto,
      Sometimes I give in and use the stickers, it just depends on the model. But - I hate stickers on scale or semi scale models. Sometimes you run across them in different runs of the Estes Bullpup. I have two Estes Black Brants, one is water slide, the other is stickers.

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  3. Speaking of "Go Wild" type of schemes... The "Body Skin" product line definitely look interesting to try out on model rockets:
    http://pinecar.woodlandscenics.com/show/category/PCPaint/page/1
    http://pinecar.woodlandscenics.com/show/category/PCPaint/page/2

    (It's scary to realize that it's been well over 45 years since I'd participated in a Pinewood Derby - back when I was in Cub Scouts. Much has changed since then -- there are a *lot* more options available now. One of these days I'll have to get around restoring the cars I've got from that period [the plastic became brittle and had shattered])

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    1. Hi Naoto,
      The body skins are interesting, I have to wonder how well they adhere and fit into inside corners. I participated in the Pinewood Derby and Space Derby when I was a Boy Scout.

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  4. On a similar note of "Go Wild"... Have toyed with the idea of "wallpapering" rocket with some chiyogami (do a Google image search on "chiyogami" to see examples of some patterns). Covering the entire model might be too much, but it might be interesting as an accent by covering certain panels or sections only.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Naoto,
      I did look up "Chiyogami". I could see where you could use it to paper fins and maybe body tube wraps. Good food for thought!

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  5. On yet another take on "go wild" idea -- "itasha" and "dekotora" (you can Google these terms to get an idea)

    "Itasha" style on aeroplane in Ace Combat videogame with girls from IdolM@ster
    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=ace+combat+idol+m%40ster

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